Prof. Peter Becker

Biomedical Center Munich, Ludwig Maximillians University Munich, Germany

Peter Becker is Acting Director of the Biomedical Center Munich and heads the Molecular Biology Division. His research focusses on understanding the dynamics of chromatin organisation and its influence on gene expression and DNA repair. In particular, his group is interested in the physiological roles and mechanism of action of nucleosome remodelling factors, and in understanding the chromosome-wide gene regulation that underlies dosage compensation in Drosophila.

Prof. Bradley Cairns

Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA

Professor Bradley Cairns is an HHMI investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. He investigates how chromatin structure helps regulate gene transcription. To do this he characterises the large protein complexes that are responsible for remodeling and modifying chromosomal structure, and studies how these chromatin-regulatory complexes function in living cells. He also studies how chromatin structure and DNA methylation contribute to pluripotency in germ cells and early embryos.

Prof. Rudolf Jaenisch

The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, USA

Rudolf Jaenisch is Professor of Biology at the Whitehead Institute and the Department of Biology, MIT. He generated the first transgenic mice carrying exogenous DNA in the germ line and was the first to use insertional mutagenesis to identify developmental genes. He has defined molecular mechanisms that are crucial for nuclear reprogramming and most recently has used direct reprogramming of somatic cells to generate “induced Pluripotent Stem” (iPS) cells.

Prof. Josef Jiricny

Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zürich, Switzerland

Professor Jiricny is Director of the Institute of Molecular Cancer Research at the University of Zürich. He studies mechanisms of DNA metabolism with particular emphasis on links between DNA repair malfunction and cancer. He co-founded the Functional Genomics Center Zürich, a state-of-the art “-omics” technology platform, and is Chair of the University Research Priority Program in Functional Genomics/Systems Biology. 

Prof. Ruth Lehmann

Skirball Institute, NYU School of Medicine, New York, USA

Ruth Lehmann is an HHMI Investigator and the director of the Skirball Institute and Chair of the Department of Cell Biology at NYU School of Medicine. Her lab focusses on the development of the Drosophila germ line. She is particularly interested in understanding the role of RNA localisation and translation in germ cell specification and fate decisions. Additionally, her group is currently studying the migration of primordial germ cells, as well as investigating mechanisms that protect the genome from damage in the germ line.

Prof. Renato Paro

Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Basel, Switzerland

Professor Paro is Founding Director of the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at the ETH Zürich in Basel. His research group studies the mechanisms of epigenetic gene control and cellular signalling. His laboratory has continuously developed new technologies, including the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique now used worldwide to detect and map the in vivo distribution of chromatin and DNA-associated proteins.

Dr Jan-Michael Peters

Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna, Austria

Dr Jan-Michael Peters is Scientific Director of the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna. His research into mitosis and chromatin biology has led to the discovery of several proteins with important roles in cell division. In particular, he is interested in understanding how sister chromatid cohesion is regulated in cells at a molecular level. Dr Peters is currently leading the MitoSys project, an international, interdisciplinary consortium, which aims to build a comprehensive model of mitosis using a systems biology approach. He participates in the SAB as a permanent guest without a vote.