IMB-Mainz/news https://www.imb.de/ News en IMB-Mainz/news https://www.imb.de/typo3conf/ext/tt_news/ext_icon.gif https://www.imb.de/ 18 16 News TYPO3 - get.content.right http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:50:00 +0200 Sara Vieira-Silva awarded the Antoine Faes Prize https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/sara-vieira-silva-awarded-the-antoine-faes-prize For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

20 September – Dr Sara Vieira-Silva has been awarded the Antoine Faes Prize for her postdoctoral research on the role of the human gut microbiome in health and disease. Sara joined the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) as an Adjunct Group Leader this year and is also a Group Leader at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

The Antoine Faes Prize is awarded every three years by the Antoine Faes Foundation to support biomedical research in Belgium with a positive societal impact. The winners were selected by an international jury of leading experts. This year, the winning research theme was “Microbiology: good and bad micro-organisms”. The prize was jointly awarded to Prof. Sarah Lebeer (University of Antwerp, Belgium) and Prof. Jeroen Raes, Dr Gwen Falony and Dr Vieira-Silva (KU Leuven, Belgium).

Sara’s research focuses on microorganisms that live in the human gut. When these gut microbe populations are disrupted (e.g. by changes in diet), they can contribute to diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease or ageing by promoting inflammation or producing carcinogens and endocrine disruptors. The Antoine Faes prize recognises Dr Vieira-Silva’s work on the Flemish Gut Flora Project at the Catholic University in Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium, where she worked for the last 8 years as a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Prof. Jeroen Raes. For this project, she studied gut microbe samples from more than 3,000 individuals to understand natural variation in the human microbiome and its metabolic contribution to human health.

The results of the study, which were published in two articles in the journal Science in 2016 and Nature Microbiology in 2019, revealed that humans have at least four distinct patterns of gut microbes and that one of these is associated with inflammatory diseases. More recently, Sara and her collaborators showed that lipid-lowering drugs called statins may restore disturbed gut microbiome profiles in obesity-associated low-grade inflammation, opening future opportunities for new therapeutic treatments (published in the journal Nature in 2021).

We warmly congratulate Sara on receiving the Antoine Faes Prize.


Further details

Sara Vieira-Silva is an Adjunct Group Leader at IMB and a Group Leader the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Further information about research in Vieira-Silva lab can be found at www.imb.de/vieira-silva.

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de.

About Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is a globally recognized research-driven university with around 31,000 students from over 120 nations. Its core research areas are in particle and hadron physics, the materials sciences, and translational medicine. JGU's success in Germany's Excellence Strategy program has confirmed its academic excellence: In 2018, the research network PRISMA+ (Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter) was recognized as a Cluster of Excellence – building on its forerunner, PRISMA. Moreover, excellent placings in national and international rankings as well as numerous honors and awards demonstrate the research and teaching quality of Mainz-based researchers and academics. Further information at www.uni-mainz.de/eng

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

 

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Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:50:00 +0200
Public lecture on “The mystery of human ageing” by Prof. Björn Schumacher https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/public-lecture-on-the-mystery-of-human-ageing-by-prof-bjoern-schumacher For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

15 September – Ageing is one of the greatest challenges facing our society. Soon, one-third of our population will be over the age of 65 and many of these individuals will suffer from age-related diseases, such as dementia, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes or arthritis. We cordially invite you to join a public lecture on “The mystery of human ageing: New insights into the biology of ageing” by Prof. Björn Schumacher from the CECAD (Cluster of Excellence on Cellular stress response in Aging-associated Disease) in Cologne. Prof. Schumacher will explain the underlying causes of ageing alongside new and emerging ways to counteract the ageing process and prevent age-related diseases. These techniques can be used to promote healthy ageing in human societies in the future.

Prof. Björn Schumacher is the Director of the Institute for Genome Stability in Aging and Disease at the CECAD in Cologne. His research focuses on how DNA damage leads to loss of function and disease with age, and how organisms cope with this challenge. In particular, his group was responsible for discovering the GDISR (germline DNA damage-induced systemic stress resistance) pathway, a previously unknown immune mechanism that is activated in response to DNA damage, thereby prolonging life. Prof. Bjorn Schumacher has been awarded the Innovation Prize from the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, holds an ERC starting grant, coordinates the Marie Curie ITN research network “CodeAge” on chronic DNA damage responses in ageing, and is a member of various editorial boards of international journals.

The lecture will take place at 18:00 on 22 September at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) in Mainz. This lecture is part of the IMB/SFB 1361 Conference on “Restore, Reorganise, Repurpose: The many faces of DNA repair” and is co-organised by the Centre for Healthy Ageing (CHA). The lecture will be held in German is open to the general public.

For more information, please check the webpage of the IMB/SFB conference: https://www.sfb1361.de/2022conference/oeffentlicher-vortrag-public-lecture


Further details

Further information on Prof. Schumacher’s research: https://schumacher.cecad-labs.uni-koeln.de/home

About the Centre for Healthy Ageing, Mainz

The Centre for Healthy Ageing (CHA) is a virtual research centre launched in 2021 that brings together scientists in basic and clinical research from across Mainz that focus on ageing and age-related diseases. These findings should be used to promote healthy ageing and to find treatments that could prevent or cure age-related disease. For more information, please visit: www.cha-mainz.de.

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH, Mainz

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million euros in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de.

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders nationwide. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. https://www.boehringer-ingelheim-stiftung.de/en/index.html

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

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Thu, 15 Sep 2022 09:38:26 +0200
The IPP Winter Call is now OPEN! https://www.imb.de//students-postdocs/international-phd-programme/apply-to-ipp To apply and for more information click here! Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:21:00 +0200 Sara Vieira-Silva joins IMB as an Adjunct Group Leader https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/sara-vieira-silva-joins-imb-as-an-adjunct-group-leader For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

12 September – The Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) is pleased to announce that Dr Sara Vieira-Silva has joined us as an Adjunct Group Leader. Sara is an expert in microbiome research and studies the contribution of gut microbes to human metabolism and disease. She joins us from the Catholic University in Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium, where she worked as a postdoctoral researcher.

The human colon is home to a vast community of microorganisms, some of which play important roles in breaking down food or synthesising vitamins. However, disruption of the gut microbiome (e.g. by diet, physiology or pathogens) can contribute to disease by promoting inflammation or producing active compounds (such as carcinogens or endocrine disruptors). Changes in the gut microbiome have been associated with many diseases, especially those associated with old age such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. As a result, researchers are very interested in identifying new gut microbiome markers of human health and disease.

However, identifying disease-associated microbial changes requires a comprehensive knowledge of the human microbiome and how it varies in health and disease. Sara’s research focuses on characterising the dynamics of the normal gut microbiome in healthy adults and contrasting these with abnormal, disease-associated microbiome profiles. Her lab also uses computational modelling approaches to study microbiome changes in response to short-term dietary changes and therapeutic drug treatments, and whether different microbiome profiles correlate with different treatment outcomes. These studies could lead to the development of novel treatments for disease, as well as providing biomarkers for predicting a successful response to treatment.

We warmly welcome Sara to IMB and look forward to seeing more of her research findings in the coming years.


Further details

Sara Vieira-Silva is an Adjunct Group Leader at IMB and a Group Leader at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Further information about research in the Vieira-Silva lab can be found at www.imb.de/vieira-silva

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de

About Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is a globally recognized research-driven university with around 31,000 students from over 120 nations. Its core research areas are in particle and hadron physics, the materials sciences, and translational medicine. JGU's success in Germany's Excellence Strategy program has confirmed its academic excellence: In 2018, the research network PRISMA+ (Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter) was recognized as a Cluster of Excellence – building on its forerunner, PRISMA. Moreover, excellent placings in national and international rankings as well as numerous honors and awards demonstrate the research and teaching quality of Mainz-based researchers and academics. Further information at www.uni-mainz.de/eng

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

 

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Mon, 12 Sep 2022 09:53:14 +0200
Light-sensing proteins help marine animals figure out the right phase of the moon to synchronise their reproduction https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/light-sensing-proteins-help-marine-animals-figure-out-the-right-phase-of-the-moon-to-synchronise-their-reproduction For more information click here

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT

09 September – Many marine animals time their reproduction precisely with the phases of the moon. However, scientists did not know how they kept track of the lunar cycle. Now, researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB)/Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, and the Max Perutz Labs, Vienna, Austria/Alfred Wegener Institute and University of Oldenburg, Germany, have uncovered a major piece of this mystery by studying the marine bristle worm (Platynereis dumerilii). The key lies in a light-sensing protein called L-cryptochrome (L-Cry), which helps it to distinguish between different phases of the moon, as well as moonlight from other types of light.

Once a month, approximately five days after the night of the full moon, millions of marine bristle worms swim to the surface of the Mediterranean Sea. They come out en masse for an enormous spawning event. Everything depends on the worms spawning together at the same time, as this maximises their chances of fertilisation.

Like the bristle worm, many other marine animals such as corals, starfish, worms, turtles and fish also rely on the phases of the moon to synchronise their reproduction precisely. In the case of the bristle worm, the light of the full moon is responsible for synchronising the worms’ inner monthly clock (also known as a circalunar oscillator). But how do these animals distinguish the light of the full moon from other types of light, such as sunlight?

To answer this question, the lab of Prof. Eva Wolf (Institute of Molecular Biology [IMB] and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany) teamed up with the lab of Prof. Kristin Tessmar-Raible (Max Perutz Labs, Vienna, Austria, and Alfred Wegener Institute and University of Oldenburg, Germany). They discovered that bristle worms synchronise their monthly clocks with the help of a light-sensing protein called L-cryptochrome (L-Cry), which is able to distinguish between different types of light, such as sunlight and moonlight.

L-Cry contains a molecule called FAD (or flavin adenine dinucleotide), which undergoes a biochemical change when exposed to light. This allows L-Cry to shift between a ‘dark state’ and a ‘light state’. Importantly, L-Cry proteins come in pairs. The researchers found that under light with same intensity and spectrum as the light of the full moon, it took about 6 hours for only one of the two L-Cry molecules to change to the light state. In contrast, under (much brighter) sunlight, both L-Cry molecules converted to the light state within minutes. This suggests that one of the two L-Cry molecules acts as a ‘low light sensor’ for moonlight, while the other acts as a ‘high light sensor’ that only responds to sunlight.  In other words, L-Cry can actually adopt three distinct molecular states: a ‘dark state’, a ‘moonlight state’ and a ‘sunlight state’.

Prof. Wolf says, “Based on these molecular properties, we see that L-Cry can act as a light interpreter that not only discriminates between darkness, sunlight and moonlight, but also between different moon phases.”  The researchers propose that during a full moon, when the moon shines for at least 6 hours, moonlight can activate the ‘low light’ L-Cry sensor, which enables the worms to adjust their monthly timing system to the correct moon phase.

These findings could have many implications beyond the reproduction of bristle worms. Prof. Tessmar-Raible says, “We think that similar mechanisms could also be used by many other organisms to discriminate between naturally-occurring light sources, which is of key importance for any organism that depends on light to adjust its physiology and behaviour. Moonlight is not just a dim version of sunlight; nocturnal versus diurnal light has very different meanings for organisms.” Moreover, the proliferation of human cities means that many animals (and humans) are now constantly exposed to artificial lights, which could disrupt natural ecosystems and pose serious threats to human health. By understanding how organisms sense and react to different types of light, the researchers hope to better understand and find ways to prevent the negative effects of artificial lights on human health and the environment.

The findings were published this week in the journal Nature Communications.


Further details

Cheryl Li is a Science Writer at the Institute of Molecular Biology.

Further information can be found at www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-32562-z

Eva Wolf is an Adjunct Director at IMB and a Professor of Biology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Further information about research in Wolf lab can be found at www.imb.de/wolf

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de

About Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is a globally recognized research-driven university with around 31,000 students from over 120 nations. Its core research areas are in particle and hadron physics, the materials sciences, and translational medicine. JGU's success in Germany's Excellence Strategy program has confirmed its academic excellence: In 2018, the research network PRISMA+ (Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter) was recognized as a Cluster of Excellence – building on its forerunner, PRISMA. Moreover, excellent placings in national and international rankings as well as numerous honors and awards demonstrate the research and teaching quality of Mainz-based researchers and academics. Further information at www.uni-mainz.de/eng

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de  

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

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Fri, 09 Sep 2022 10:39:37 +0200
Edward Lemke elected as an EMBO member https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/edward-lemke-elected-as-an-embo-member For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

6 July - Professor Edward Lemke has been elected as an EMBO Member, joining a group of more than 1,900 top researchers in Europe and around the world.

EMBO (European Molecular Biology Organisation) is a prestigious international organisation of life scientists, with members selected by the Council of EMBO. This year, 67 new EMBO Members were elected from 15 EU member states (as well as 9 associate members from 7 countries outside the EU). This great honour marks Prof. Lemke as a distinguished scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the field of life sciences. As an EMBO member, he will serve on the EMBO Council, evaluate EMBO funding applications and help mentor the next generation of young scientists.

Edward joined IMB as an Adjunct Director in 2018 and is a leading expert in deciphering how intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) function in the cell. These proteins, which have flexible, dynamic structures, constitute up to 50% of the human proteome and play key roles in many diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disease. The disordered nature of IDPs allows them to have greater versatility and adaptability than rigid proteins but also makes them particularly difficult to study.

Edward’s group develops innovative techniques using synthetic and chemical biology to study the biological dynamics of IDPs at high temporal and spatial resolution. His group has made major contributions to understanding how the intrinsic disorder and dynamics of these molecules contribute key functionality to the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery, which is vital for protecting the genome and regulating the traffic of biomolecules in and out of the cell nucleus.

We warmly congratulate Edward on his election as an EMBO member.


Further details

Further information can be found at the EMBO press release https://www.embo.org/press-releases/embo-elects-67-new-members-and-associate-members.

Edward Lemke is an Adjunct Director at IMB and Professor of Synthetic Biophysics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Further information about research in the Lemke lab can be found at www.imb.de/research/lemke.

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de.

About Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is a globally recognized research-driven university with around 31,500 students. Its main core research areas are in particle and hadron physics, the materials sciences, and translational medicine, while its most outstanding research achievements in the humanities have been attained in the fields of American Studies and Historical Cultural Studies. JGU's academic excellence is reflected in its success in the Excellence Initiative of the German federal and state governments: In 2012, the university's Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter (PRISMA) Cluster of Excellence was approved and the funding of its Materials Science in Mainz (MAINZ) Graduate School of Excellence was extended. Moreover, excellent placings in national and international rankings, as well as numerous other honors and awards, demonstrate just how successful Mainz-based researchers and academics are. Further information at www.uni-mainz.de/eng.

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Fax: +49 (0) 6131 39 21421, Email: press@imb.de

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Wed, 06 Jul 2022 15:11:19 +0200
Jan Padeken joins IMB as a Group Leader https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/jan-padeken-joins-imb-as-a-group-leader For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

2 June – The Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) is delighted to welcome Jan Padeken as IMB’s newest Group Leader. Previously, Jan worked as a senior postdoc at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel, Switzerland. Jan’s research focuses on understanding how heterochromatin is altered in response to persistent stress and how this contributes to genome stability and the maintenance of tissue integrity.

With the cell, DNA is wrapped around histone proteins, forming a structure similar to beads on a string. Chemical modifications on these histone proteins (e.g. methylation) can control the compaction of the DNA, and thereby silence or activate gene expression.

DNA that is highly compacted is known as heterochromatin and is marked by histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me). In multicellular eukaryotes, heterochromatin has two main functions: first, it silences the transcription of satellite repeats and transposable elements. Second, it silences tissue-specific genes during development. Dysregulation of heterochromatin therefore activates repetitive elements and genes that should be silenced, resulting in genomic instability and mutations, as well as loss of tissue integrity.

Despite the importance of heterochromatin in maintaining genomic and tissue integrity, we know very little about what controls heterochromatin establishment in complex organisms. Jan’s lab works on deciphering how heterochromatin pathways are altered in cells exposed to persistent DNA damage, and how this affects the adaptation of cells to their environment and their genomic integrity. They do this by studying heterochromatin and histone modification changes in C. elegans during ageing and in models of human diseases (such as Cockayne syndrome). By characterising the pathways that link heterochromatin and DNA damage, Jan and his team work to unravel the mechanisms underlying human diseases such as cancer and ageing.


Further details

Jan Padeken is a Group Leader at IMB. Further information about research in the Padeken lab can be found at www.imb.de/padeken.

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de.

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

 

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Thu, 02 Jun 2022 14:58:00 +0200
2022 IMB/SFB 1361 Conference https://www.imb.de//2022conference Registration is now open! Mon, 30 May 2022 14:43:24 +0200 Marina Rodnina joins IMB’s Scientific Advisory Board https://www.imb.de//about-imb/news/detail/marina-rodnina-joins-imbs-scientific-advisory-board For more information click here

PRESS RELEASE

5 April – The Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) is pleased to welcome Prof. Marina Rodnina to its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). Marina is the Director of Physical Biochemistry at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen and a renowned expert in ribosome function and mRNA translation.

Prof. Rodnina is best known for her work in deciphering the dynamics of ribosome function. Her lab investigates how different components of the ribosome interact and communicate with each other to facilitate the movement of tRNAs and mRNA through the ribosome during translation. In particular, she is interested in how these ribosomal reactions ensure that mRNAs are translated into proteins accurately and rapidly. Marina’s expertise and experience will be an invaluable asset for IMB and we look forward to welcoming her to our SAB.

IMB’s SAB is comprised of seven internationally renowned researchers, who are typically directors of research institutes. The board visits IMB each year to review its achievements and to provide valuable advice and recommendations on the institute’s strategic research directions and management, as well as recruitment and career development programmes for junior scientists.


Further details

Further information about the members of the SAB can be found at www.imb.de/about-imb/sab.  

About the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH

The Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB) is a centre of excellence in the life sciences that was established in 2011 on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Research at IMB focuses on the cutting-edge fields of epigenetics, genome stability, ageing and RNA biology. The institute is a prime example of successful collaboration between a private foundation and government: The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation has committed 154 million euros to be disbursed from 2009 until 2027 to cover the operating costs of research at IMB. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate has provided approximately 50 million euros for the construction of a state-of-the-art building and is giving a further 52 million in core funding from 2020 until 2027. For more information about IMB, please visit: www.imb.de.

Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation

The Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization that is committed to the promotion of the medical, biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical sciences. It was established in 1977 by Hubertus Liebrecht (1931–1991), a member of the shareholder family of the Boehringer Ingelheim company. Through its Perspectives Programme Plus 3 and its Exploration Grants, the Foundation supports independent junior group leaders. It also endows the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, as well as awards for up-and-coming scientists in Germany. In addition, the Foundation funds institutional projects in Germany, such as the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), the department of life sciences at the University of Mainz, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. www.bistiftung.de.

Press contact for further information

Dr Ralf Dahm, Director of Scientific Management

Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 6131 39 21455, Email: press@imb.de

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2022 IMB Conference https://www.imb.de//seminars-meetings/meetings/2022-imb-conference-epigenetics-of-ageing-responses-to-adversity-across-scales Registration is now open! Mon, 28 Mar 2022 09:34:36 +0200